"New York City babies born 6 subway stops apart have nearly a 10 year difference in life expectancy"

Now we know that "what goes on in Vegas stays in Vegas," but what researchers at  the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), recently revealed through mapping is that Las Vegas residents living just nine miles apart (i.e., from The Strip to Southeast Las Vegas) have a difference in life expectancy by up to 16 years. In New York City, babies born 6 subway stops apart have nearly a 10 year difference in life expectancy.  VCU researchers were funded by RWJF to obtain vital statistics data from the U.S. Census and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to create a series of maps to show "...life expectancy values alongside common geographic landmarks such as subway stops and highway exits." The cities of  of Las Vegas  and New York are not alone. Like many other cities across the nation, where an individual lives can produce markedly different health outcomes. These differences across neighborhoods are due to factors such as education and income, unsafe or unhealthy housing, opportunities for residents to engage in healthy behaviors such as walking, proximity to highways/factories that emit pollutants, access to health care, unreliable transit, and residential segregation.  For more information on this study please click HERE.

Jylana SheatsComment